Remember What You Read by Using SQ3R

Remembering what you have read is crucial if you try to learn something. Just reading through the text passively is not usually enough. Active reading means that the reader actively thinks about what (s)he’s reading, and marks & makes notes of key ideas.

SQ3R is an active reading-comprehension method that helps remembering the key points. It converts your notes to Q&A format. SQ5R was introduced by Francis Pleasant Robinson in his 1946 book Effective Study.  The name comes from the words Survey, Question, Read, Recite, Review.

Survey
Skim through the text: look at headings, pictures, charts, summary etc. (If studying for a test, check also what the teacher regards important.)

Question
Turn the headings and other material into questions, and write them down. You may also create more generic or your own questions, depending on the situation (e.g. the reason you are reading).

Read & Recite
Read the text. After each paragraph, try to answer the questions. Write down the answers and key points using your own words. This forces you to engage with the text, instead of just passive reading.

Review
Read the questions and try to answer them. Try to remember the key points. Check the answers from your notes. If you have trouble remembering, review your notes and repeat later.

Cornell Note Taking System

Cornell notes is a structured note-taking method, that makes SQ3R’s review process easier. Notes are arranged on a (paper) sheet:

  • Questions on the left
  • Notes on the right
  • Summary at the bottom

To review, just cover the notes and summary.

Sources

John Ramos: Guide to Effective Note Taking – SQ3R and Cornell

Virginia Tech: SQ3R – Reading/Study System

Saddleback College: SQ5R (PDF)