12 Tips to Remember What You Read

Just reading isn’t enough if you want to use that information later on. These tips help you to remember what you read.

Read with a purpose
Think why you are reading, and how the text helps you to reach your goal. This makes it easier to see the parts that are important for you.

Use the SQ3R method
SQ3R is an active reading and note-taking method that helps remembering the key points of a text.

First skim the material
Look at headings, images and captions, and read the abstract. This helps to get a sense of the whole material and subject.

Focus on blocks of text
Instead of reading word-by-word, learn to focus on larger blocks of the text. Besides making reading faster, this also helps understanding the whole.

Highlight, but not too much
Highlight only key words and ideas. After reading few paragraphs or pages, try to remember the key ideas. Then check your highlights to see if you remembered all correctly.

Think in pictures
Create a mental image of the content. Or try to experience being a part of the situation, instead of observing it from outside. Both require understanding the content and help in memorizing. Mind maps are also good for making connections between concepts.

Rehearse
Every few pages or after finishing a chapter, stop and think what you just read. Ask questions about the content. (What this means? How this helps me? What wasn’t said? How this can be applied? Where this has connections to?) Do you have real-world problems to solve? If not, find some from textbooks or old exams.

Explain
Explain the concept to someone. Summarize the text with your own words. If you can’t, re-read.

Flashcards
Make flashcards, paper or electronic. They are good for memorizing facts.

Have a break when you can’t concentrate
Stop reading for a moment after you have reached your attention span. (Typically 15 minutes for hard content.) Learn to concentrate longer.

Rehearse after reading
When finishing your reading session, rehearse again as instructed above. Repeat twice during the day, and once per day for a few days.

Re-read
Read the text again. This not only helps you to remember, but also to understand better (since you have a sense of the whole) and to correct your (possible) misinterpretations.

Sources:

Bill Klemm: 8 Tips To Remember What You Read

Quora answers on How can I read quickly but still understand and retain everything that I read?

Remember What You Read by Using SQ3R

Remembering what you have read is crucial if you try to learn something. Just reading through the text passively is not usually enough. Active reading means that the reader actively thinks about what (s)he’s reading, and marks & makes notes of key ideas.

SQ3R is an active reading-comprehension method that helps remembering the key points. It converts your notes to Q&A format. SQ5R was introduced by Francis Pleasant Robinson in his 1946 book Effective Study.  The name comes from the words Survey, Question, Read, Recite, Review.

Survey
Skim through the text: look at headings, pictures, charts, summary etc. (If studying for a test, check also what the teacher regards important.)

Question
Turn the headings and other material into questions, and write them down. You may also create more generic or your own questions, depending on the situation (e.g. the reason you are reading).

Read & Recite
Read the text. After each paragraph, try to answer the questions. Write down the answers and key points using your own words. This forces you to engage with the text, instead of just passive reading.

Review
Read the questions and try to answer them. Try to remember the key points. Check the answers from your notes. If you have trouble remembering, review your notes and repeat later.

Cornell Note Taking System

Cornell notes is a structured note-taking method, that makes SQ3R’s review process easier. Notes are arranged on a (paper) sheet:

  • Questions on the left
  • Notes on the right
  • Summary at the bottom

To review, just cover the notes and summary.

Sources

John Ramos: Guide to Effective Note Taking – SQ3R and Cornell

Virginia Tech: SQ3R – Reading/Study System

Saddleback College: SQ5R (PDF)